Logo
Soundstreams showcases the work of Canadian and international composers through innovative musical experiences.

Blog

The Globe and Mail: Soundstreams bringing new music the old way

New Music used to be the Buckley’s cough medicine of the classical world – it tasted awful, but it was good for you. There was a hint of the church about it – a celebration of obscure rites for the faithful, desperately clinging to their belief in the importance of the new, scorned and belittled,…  Read More

The WholeNote: Steve Reich, Then & Now (April cover story)

Then: My first experience of meeting the renowned American composer Steve Reich was in a master class he gave for composition students at the University of Toronto’s Faculty of Music. It was early in 1976 and he was in town as the guest of New Music Concerts who presented performances of his music during both…  Read More

Toronto Star: Soundstreams unveils 2016/17 season

Canadian premiere of Nelson Mandela University Choir, world premieres by Canadian composers and Philip Glass’s birthday. Soundstreams will present the Estonian Philharmonic Choir and Nelson Mandela University Choir, in its Canadian premiere, as part of its 2016/17 season announced Tuesday. There will be four world premieres by Canadian composers Anna Höstman, Gabriel Dharmoo, Riho Esko…  Read More

Musical Toronto: Soundstreams Announces 2016/17 Season

Soundstreams have released their 34th season line-up that includes a variety of programming exploring new formats in music theatre, choral music, and chamber music. Most notable is Odditorium: an eclectic staging by theatre director Chris Abraham of excerpts from R. Murray Schafer’s Patria cycle, complete with circus carnival barker. Following last year’s genre-bending Electric Messiah,…  Read More

Opera Ramblings: Soundstreams 16/17 Season

Soundstreams have just announced their 2016/17 season.  There’s quite a lot there for those with an experimental taste in vocal music as well as a bunch of instrumental stuff.  Probably the biggest deal is a staging of “musical curiosities” from R. Murray Schafer’s Patria cycle. Odditorium will feature selections from The Greatest Show, Ra, and others, immersing audiences in a circus-like atmosphere, complete…  Read More

CBC News: Are accordions cool again?

It seems that accordions are making a comeback. That’s not only because the box-shaped instrument can be heard in new songs from Mumford & Sons, Arcade Fire, and The Lumineers. The trend goes deeper than that. The accordion, or squeezebox, is coming back into vogue after a generation of ridicule. New York’s Carnegie Hall had its…  Read More

Toronto Star: Accordion achieves new musical heights in ‘Squeezebox’

Squeezebox, stomach Steinway, accordion: this modest instrument from the folk fringes is preparing for its time in the spotlight. Just as the cello and organ have recently been jazzed up and introduced to music lovers beyond their traditional realm, the accordion is gaining new acclaim. Squeezebox, an evening of contemporary music presented by Soundstreams on…  Read More

NOW Magazine: Three Squeezebox Performers Sound Off Ahead of ‘Squeezebox’

Squeezeboxes from all over the world take centre stage at the all-accordion concert Squeezebox, featuring classical and contemporary music. Three of the performers tell us a little bit about their squeezebox of choice.  Héctor Del Curto “A bandoneón is a reed instrument invented in Germany and derived from the concertina. It was meant to replace the…  Read More

Opera Ramblings: ‘Handel plugged in’ (Electric Messiah review)

Soundstreams’ high concept show Electric Messiah opened at the Drake Underground last night. So what is Electric Messiah? It’s a potent mix of Handel/Jennens, four exceptional singers from varied backgrounds, electronics, turntable artists and electric guitars. It’s “staged” in the round in a dive bar with the audience and artists mixed up all over the…  Read More

Toronto Star: ‘How do you like your Messiah?’

George Frideric Handel wrote Messiah toward the end of his life and it has become his lasting legacy. First performed in Dublin on April 13, 1742, followed by its London premiere nearly a year later, it became known as one of the most frequently performed choral works in Western music. Dipping into the St. James…  Read More

CBC Radio profiles Julie’s Sharleen Joynt

She reflects on the apparent chasm between pop culture and high art, her latest role in Canadian Stage’s Julie, and why she strayed from the predictable path of a rising opera talent. Check it out here:  Q Interview: Soprano Sharleen Joynt on operatic bliss and life post Bachelor.